Growth through standardisation
Electricity is the major source that will power Smart Cities. It drives technological innovations that make cities smarter. It also ensures sufficient fresh water supplies, disposal of sewerage, facilitates travel from one point to another efficiently, ensures safety and security…

Electricity is the major source that will power Smart Cities. It drives technological innovations that make cities smarter.

It also ensures sufficient fresh water supplies, disposal of sewerage, facilitates travel from one point to another efficiently, ensures safety and security and other aspects promised by the Smart City.

It is reckoned that by 2050, 66 per cent of the world’s population is expected to live in urban areas. The challenge will be to supply these populations with basic resources like safe food, clean water and sufficient energy, while also ensuring overall economic, social and environmental sustainability.

Already today, cities consume around 70 per cent of all energy produced globally, while generating 70 per cent of world GDP.

There is no way a Smart City can function without electric power and hardware to run smart technologies. Without it modern city management, the Internet of Things and all the city services would remain only wishful thinking.

Modern cities should substantially increase the efficiency in which they operate and use their resources optimally. Major efficiency improvements can be achieved by horizontally interconnecting individual systems such as electricity, water, sanitation and waste management and transportation, but also security, environmental monitoring or weather intelligence.

But interconnection is easier said than done as it requires technologies that are smart and efficiently. Many of the currently deployed systems in cities originate from different suppliers and they are maintained by various agencies that generally work in isolation. To connect them both physically and virtually, standardised interfaces need to be put in place.

Building a Smart City is highly complex. Every city faces its own challenges and requires its own mix of solutions.

However, there is one common denominator that greatly simplifies this task. For this international standards in technology should be adopted and implemented.

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