‘Intelligent’ electronic devices
Smart Cities are founded by integrating ‘intelligent’ electronic devices into local governance systems in order to find solutions to city-wide problems, improving daily living and managing resources more efficiently. The ability of connected devices to link with city infrastructure is…

Smart Cities are founded by integrating ‘intelligent’ electronic devices into local governance systems in order to find solutions to city-wide problems, improving daily living and managing resources more efficiently.

The ability of connected devices to link with city infrastructure is set to change the way people live, work and move around urban environments. From smarter transport systems, to innovative health care and more intelligent use of energy, the technology-driven cities are being eyed by governments as indispensible for modernisation.

Policy makers, municipalities and entrepreneurs across the world are exploring how smart technologies could be applied economically to help in mobility, smart parking bays, electric vehicles and renewable energy technologies.

What is interesting to note is that these technological innovations are being used to transform cities that lack any kind of modern infrastructure and/or considered developing societies.

In developed countries the challenge is to work out   how to deploy new ‘smart’ systems, boasting all the advantages associated with the latest digital and data sharing technologies, when there is already complex legacy infrastructure in place.

Their challenge is to find an economical way to replace legacy infrastructure or integrate it with new smarter systems designed to make things work better. There can be great cost and complexity associated with retro-fitting cities to make them the Smart Cities of tomorrow.

Technology companies in mature economies can also come up against complex regulatory, compliance and legal frameworks which may not be able to adapt with the speed necessary to accommodate the new technologies and concepts that are being developed.

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